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Impossible Burgers are all the rage, but are they safe for kids?

Plant-based burgers are heating up the fast food wars.

CLEVELAND — We’ve seen the Impossible Burger gain popularity, but how safe are they for your kids to eat?

Parents.com recently posted an article from a dietitian who points out that most people assume Impossible Burgers are a healthier alternative.

“Yes, eating less meat and more plants can be a healthy move if you end up eating more nutrient-loaded veggies and less saturated fat and cholesterol,” dietitian Sally Kuzemchak wrote in the Parents.com article. “Yet some of the newer meatless patties actually have as much saturated fat as beef burgers, and in some cases, even more thanks to oils (like coconut) that are used to make them.”

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Yes, most families should be eating more plant-based meals, but before you tell your kids that can have unlimited Impossible burgers, remember that it is still a food product made in a lab with a long list of ingredients.

“Let me tell you, I have plenty of vegan patients that in the beginning were some of the most unhealthy patients I've ever seen,” said Channel 3 “Mom Squad” dietitian Kristin Kirkpatrick of the Cleveland Clinic. “So, like white bread and vegan processed meals and things like that. So, again, with the vegan diet, I think kids can be on it, I think they can be healthy without a doubt. We definitely have data to show that, but you as mom and dad have to do it right.”

That means making sure kids are getting fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes rather than a lot of overly processed food products.

Basically, the Impossible Burger is like any other fast food burger. It’s a treat.

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