50 years after winning state, players meet to talk football, segregation, and life

Eight champions sat down to talk about the peak of the Civil Rights Movement. In the fall of 1966, two communities celebrated the ultimate achievement in sports. A Texas High School football state championship.

During the peak of the civil rights movement, the state of Texas had two leagues governing high school football. The all black league was called the Prairie View Interscholastic League and the rest of the state played under the umbrella of the University Interscholastic League which is still in existence today.

The Hebert Panthers defeated Dallas Madison 14-3 in their Class 4A state championship. The Bridge City Cardinals dominated their Class 3A title game against McKinney 30-6.

Even though the two communities were only thirty miles apart, they didn't get to routinely watch each other play, they were two busy playing on Friday nights. 12 News sat down with four players from each school fifty years after they were labeled as champions, and all of them will tell you, being considered great citizens in the community means a lot more in life than just winning a bunch of football games back in high school. 

Society has changed since 1966 and in this report, the amount of respect shown between the players of the two teams that never got to play each other was very present.

(© 2016 KBMT)


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment